THE CRAMPS: Fiends Of Dope Island.

19 09 2017

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So here we are, the last record by The Cramps. In 2003, The Cramps released Fiends Of Dope Island- their eight full length record. It isn’t my favourite record, but thankfully it still has THAT sound that we all knew and love. The sound that defined them. The sound that made them so important and so influential.

I thought writing about all their records would have taken me longer than this. However, from the start I knew it was something I would have to see through. Besides, what else am I going to do with my spare time?

Fiends Of Dope Island opens with Big Black Witchcraft Rock. It’s a heavy song in comparison to what they have previously done. This record is a heavy sounding record and in some parts of the record, it doesn’t completely sound like The Cramps. I know a band shouldn’t make the same sounding record over and over. The Cramps never did that, but you always knew it was them. There is no fault at all in Ivy’s raucous guitar skills- you never could fault her or Lux at all.

There are some great songs on this record such as Dr Fucker M.D (Musical Deviant), Dopefiend Boogie and She’s Got Balls. It is still a brilliant record by them, don’t get me wrong. But I had a bit of a hard time getting into this one. I mean nothing is going to beat A Date With Elvis or Stay Sick! for me but it is still a strong record that sits nicely with their lengthy list of releases.

I love the slick sounds on Taboo, and how Chopper Franklin truly adds something special to this cover. It also shows just how fantastic Lux’s voice was. He sings slightly different on this one. It doesn’t typically sound like him, and I think that’s why this cover really stands out on this record. It is one of my favourite covers they’ve ever done also. I love Hang Up. It’s got Lux sounding quite snarly, and I really love that. I love how he could do anything with his voice. The way he’d sound like every part of him was shaking as he sung. The banshee-like wails he makes on the end of the song are just excellent. It’s one of the best moments on the record for sure. I also think Oowee Baby is one of the songs on the record that sounds typically them. It’s got a sound that reminds me a little of their earlier records.

I feel that Fiends Of Dope Island is slightly darker than their previous records. This record does feel quite heavy. I don’t know if they knew this would be the last record they were going to make or not. It’s hard to tell.  The artwork to the record is creepy. Lux has this demonic look, and it kind of gives you an impression of how they wanted this record to sound. It is dark and it is menacing. I don’t know how this record sits amongst other fans of The Cramps. I’ve played it a few times in a row now prior to writing this and it has grown on me. I really love Dr Fucker M.D- there’s something brilliantly eerie about this song. It sounds like something you would hear playing in a horror film. You can imagine Dr Fucker being this wild doctor who just causes absolute mayhem.

From listening to all of The Cramps records, it has just made me love and appreciate them even more. No other band is ever going to make something as wonderfully sleazy as I Want To Get In Your Pants or something as decadent as Kizmiaz. The Cramps were one-offs. Every single record shows that, and maybe they knew with Fiends Of Dope Island it would be their last. I think they did set out what they had and needed to do. Of course we would have taken more. I wish I was one of the lucky ones who got to see The Cramps. Any line-up, I don’t care. I’d have just loved to have seen them.

So there we have it. All eight records written about. All eight records listened to more carefully than usual, and loved more than before.

Viva The Cramps!

 





THE CRAMPS: Big Beat From Badsville

18 09 2017

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Here comes record number seven with a blazing smack to the choppers. Big Beat From Badsville is the coolest sounding record I ever did hear. Does the record sound as cool as its name? It’s The Cramps! Of course it does! Now, let me give you a few hundred words about why this record will ease any mood, why this record feels like it could be up there as one of the best things you’ll ever hear.

The most important thing to note about this record is that it is the only record by The Cramps that doesn’t have any cover songs in. the brilliant thing about The Cramps is that they make you forget that a chunk of their songs are actually covers. They make it their own. They made whatever genre of music you want to lump them in their own. They are the loudest band you’ll ever need. Hell..they’re the only band you’re going to need.

Big Beat From Badsville came out in 1997. Its 20 years old, and it sounds like it easily could have been one of their first records. Maybe just after A Date With Elvis. The songs are as smutty as ever. They are wonderfully sleazy especially on songs like I Walked All Night, It Thing Hard-On and of course, Like A Bad Girl Should. This record has ALL the hits. It has the songs that you need to play at any party. Just play this record, and go have a great time. You can play it loud whilst at home by yourself, play it to a lover or force friends to listen to it. Whatever your mood, just play this record as loud as you can. If they turn their noses up at these genius-like songs, then kick ‘em out. Then kick out the jams!

This may be their second to last record, and it really doesn’t sound like a bad that had it in them to quit. I reckon if Lux was still here, they’d be busting up stages and giving the kids a seductive fright. Badass Bug is such a brilliant Rockabilly song. You can picture them recording this in the studio and possibly just having the best time imaginable doing so. It’s such a great song to let everything go to. Just flail your limbs about. Do whatever you want!

What I absolutely love about The Cramps is their ability to make you feel utterly free. You can be stuck in a situation that is ruining your soul, but as soon as you play this record it makes you feel so free. They just take you some place that nothing else can. Like A Bad Girl Should is such a filthy song, and if anyone else sang it- you’d probably just dismiss it but Lux does it in a way that just makes you smirk and probably think about the person you lust after. That lust shouldn’t ever fade if you’re with them. Like A Bad Girl Should is an unconventional love song.. I love how out there it is. I love how it sounds a little stalker-ish. Thing is, Lux doesn’t make any of this creepy. I love Devil Behind The Bush- you can easily tell what this is about. You’re probably a prude if you don’t get it. I reckon even the biggest prudes of them all could find a song by The Cramps that they love. Find one, and shock them with a song by The Cramps!

If I was ever looking for a record by The Cramps to reinforce or even justify (as if I need to) my love for them, I’d probably use this one. I love that it is all of their songs. I love how outrageous Lux got with the lyrics on this one. He truly lets it all go on this record, and you know what- it really makes you miss him.





THE CRAMPS: Flamejob

18 09 2017

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Record number six. What could The Cramps give us with their sixth record that they hadn’t already? They didn’t need to prove anything, they never did. Flamejob is one of their most underrated records, and it is easily one of their most boldest records.
If any song summed them up, it has to be I’m Customised. It just describes them fully. One-offs. Entirely rare. Nothing like them since. This is one of their most Rockabilly/Psychobilly sounding records. I think this might be evident the most on Sado County Auto Show. It’s a massively underrated record and it shows just how great Lux and Ivy were at producing records. Flamejob also came out on Creation. I didn’t know that and I feel that I should have. Silly me!

The Cramps took their time in between records, and it shows that a lot of thought, time and care went into these records. The magical thing about The Cramps records is that none of their records consist of fillers. Every single song deserves to be there. Every single song deserves to be heard loud and repeated over and over.

Yet again it is another record by The Cramps that shows just how underrated Poison Ivy is as a guitarist. She is one mean guitarist. Her style is so distinctive and raw. There is nobody else quite like her, and I adore her sound on Strange Love. With every record she just sounds stronger and more determined. Lux and Ivy have always had that. This determination they had together is shown on classic styled songs like Swing The Big Eyed Rabbit. There was something about them that made you realise instantly there was something special about them and what they were going to do.

I feel I haven’t discussed artwork to their records enough, and I know I could have easily done this with the records I’ve written about before. But, there is something about the artwork to Flamejob that really stands out for me. I love that Lux did the artwork, and took this photo of Ivy. I love her stance and how partially futuristic she looks. I love the orange and red giving off the fire background. I love her leather outfit and the way she looks like someone you wouldn’t want to mess with. Or you might. Depends on what you’re into. This cover is one of my favourites, and I just love everything about how you can tell a lot of thought was gone into it. It’s a precise piece of art- like everything they did. It’s nothing short of stunning.

You can’t help but really get into Mean Machine, Let’s Get Fucked Up, Inside Out and Upside Down (With You)- I could just list the whole record to be honest. Like I said, I reckon this might be one of their most underrated records. I love that Creation put it out also. I definitely need to find myself a copy of this record as soon as I get paid. Or ask someone nicely to get me it for my birthday. It’s got this feel to it that I hadn’t gotten before from their records. Maybe it’s sensing a heavier sound almost, I don’t know. But like I’ve mentioned before- The Cramps had a distinctive sound, and it is always a pleasure to just listen to them.

Flamejob again had Slim Chance on bass, but on drums there was the remarkable Harry Drumdini. The one thing I have always loved about The Cramps is that they always had loud drummers. I love drummers who are unapologetically loud and play with all they have.

Alright so that’s number six done! Go listen to it and make your Monday morning less painful.